The Top 30 Fastest Growing Careers

March 5, 2010

In the last article, Good news for workers over 50: Demographics are in your favor, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that there will be plenty of quality jobs in the next 8 years. This report highlights the top 30 fastest growing careers over that same time period.

Here’s the list:

1. Biomedical engineers
2. Network systems and data communications analysts
3. Home health aides
4. Personal and home care aides
5. Financial examiners
6. Medical scientists, except epidemiologists
7. Physician assistants
8. Skin care specialists
9. Biochemists and biophysicists
10. Athletic trainers
11. Physical therapist aides
12. Dental hygienists
13. Veterinary technologists and technicians
14. Dental assistants
15. Computer software engineers, applications
16. Medical assistants
17. Physical therapist assistants
18. Veterinarians
19. Self-enrichment education teachers
20. Compliance officers
21. Occupational therapist aides
22. Environmental engineers
23. Pharmacy technicians
24. Computer software engineers, systems software
25. Survey researchers
26. Physical therapists
27. Personal financial advisors
28. Environmental engineering technicians
29. Occupational therapist assistants
30. Fitness trainers and aerobics instructors

As you can see, these are not WalMart greeter positions. Most require a bachelor’s degree and some require masters and doctoral degrees. For those looking for their next career chapter, here are the areas where there will be a high demand for these jobs over the next 8 years. College students take note also – while jobs are scarce right now, the demand will come back quickly for these professions.

What are you doing to sharpen your skills and take advantage of the next job recovery?

By the way, you can see my columns on career coaching and transitions at SF Examiner.com.

JP McDermott is a financial services and insurance advisor in Walnut Creek, CA. specializing in career transitions. He is also a career and financial coach, a freelance writer on career coaching with SF Examiner.com, and has been volunteering his time and experience to various non-profit, service and civic organizations.
JP lives in Danville with his wife Candy.

Check out his LinkedIn profile http://www.linkedin.com/in/jpmcdermott
JP Headshot1

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Good news for workers over 50: Demographics are in your favor

February 18, 2010

Despite the fact that the unemployment/underemployment rate is approaching 1 in 5 people, The US Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Employment Projections 2008- 2018 has some good news for the mature worker: demographics.

As reported in a previous article on Why older workers will get hired: 5 tips, there will be many more jobs for those over 55 who wish to continue working. Despite the softer reasons why older workers are an excellent resource (strong work ethic, experienced problem solvers, understand customers, etc.) there is another reason for optimism: the number of workers entering the work force during the period will be significantly less.

This is due to declining birth rates coupled with an increasing demand for workers, primarily information workers. 24% of the workforce by 2018 will be over 55, as compared to 18% in 2008
Here are some of the details from the report:

Total employment is projected to increase by 15.3 million, or 10.1 percent, during the 2008-18 period, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. The projections show an aging and more racially and ethnically diverse labor force, and employment growth in service-providing industries. More than half of the new jobs will be in professional and related occupations and service occupations.

In addition, occupations where a post-secondary degree or award is usually required are expected to account for one-third of total job openings during the projection period. Job openings from replacement needs–those which occur when workers who retire or otherwise leave their occupations need to be replaced–are projected to be more than double the number of openings due to economic growth.

The projected growth for the 2008-18 period is larger than the increase of 10.4 million over the 1998-2008 period, or 7.4 percent. The relatively slow growth rate for the earlier 10-year period was affected by the recession which began in December 2007, and the projected growth rate is higher than would otherwise
be expected because the 2008 starting point is a recession year.

In addition to this, there are positive indicators that overall hiring is beginning to pick up, starting with factory jobs, as reported in yesterday’s Wall Street Journal. There are anecdotal signs that small business is beginning to hire as well.

Even though it may not appear that the jobs are available for older workers, be patient – the jobs are on their way.

By the way, you can see my columns on career coaching and transitions at SF Examiner.com.

JP McDermott is a financial services and insurance advisor in Walnut Creek, CA. specializing in career transitions. He is also a career and financial coach, a freelance writer on career coaching with SF Examiner.com, and has been volunteering his time and experience to various non-profit, service and civic organizations.
JP lives in Danville with his wife Candy.

Check out his LinkedIn profile http://www.linkedin.com/in/jpmcdermott
JP Headshot1